Midtown Loft

Midtown Loft


Project Credits
Principals
Marianne Hyde, Stas Zakrzewski
Project Team
Jeff Dee
General Contractor
Tamas
Photography
ZH Architects

This midtown Manhattan loft apartment is located on West 42nd street; it began as two smaller single exposure apartments. The opportunity arose for the client to buy the adjacent apartment and combine the two to create a much larger apartment. The space located off the apartment entrance was light-deficient but was also quite expansive allowing the opportunity to create a range of uses. Through two separate semi-transparent and flexible wood interventions, the primary space of the loft was developed into a series of support spaces for the owner.

The first move was to create a ribbed quarter-sawn oak and glass wall at the entrance. This wall provides both an entrance foyer and a home office for the Owner in the area that was previously the darkest portion of both apartments. By creating a new semi-transparent wall of wood and glass, light is borrowed from the South-facing windows to this newly programmed core while retaining some degree of visual privacy for the home office. Across the hall the existing studs were re-used, clerestory windows added and then the existing bath, bed and kitchen wall were clad in the same language of oak ribbing. This unifies the entry sequence and provides a new atmosphere in this part of the apartment.

The client wanted the living room to be used for entertaining but also have the ability to be further sectioned off into a guest retreat when needed. As a counter to the very intricate oak wood screen a simple maple-lined, painted white wood cabinet unit was located strategically to create a dining zone with a relationship to the kitchen. Within this freestanding dividing unit is hidden a sliding wood wall. This wall can be pulled out and locked into the Southern wall to create a guest bedroom or a quieter room within the otherwise open loft.

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