AVSO

AVSO


Project Credits
Principals
Marianne Hyde, Stas Zakrzewski
Project Team
Patti Anahory, Erin Bahrke, Derek Johnson
Architects of Record
SLCE Architects
Structural Engineer
DeNardis Associates
MEPS Engineer
John DiBari Engineers
Photography
Edward Caruso & ZH Architects

For the offices of this critically and commercially successful commercial advertising company, ZH designed the space to be able to literally expand and contract horizontally and vertically based on the current workload of the company.

The space consisted of two floors, one at street level and the other in the basement. The basement space was to house the conference room and work overflow for the office. It was critical that it be developed as a primary space and maintain a vertical connection to the upstairs and the street. To this end, the stair was developed to float in a large double-height space, with a simple glass rail which provided a visual connection between floors and also allowed natural light to reach the lower level. The wood reception desk anchors this open core and seemingly grows out of the walnut trim of the double height space.

On the lower level a custom stainless steel and glass folding door system was developed to allow the space to read horizontally as a single unified space which had the potential to be broken up into distinct work zones without losing light and visual connection to ground level.

The entire space was then unified with a simple material palette of wood and glass with accents of highly graphic wallpaper. The ceiling plane was dropped to create a clean plane for the insertion of lighting while also hiding the mechanical, sprinklers and wiring of the office space.

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